George hillocks teaching writing as reflective practice to improve

Teachers College Press, April

George hillocks teaching writing as reflective practice to improve

Someone give me a research grant! However, I will admit that it took me a moment to figure out why George Hillocks Jr. I couldn't help noting that during his attempt to reconcile quantitative and qualitative research that Hillocks admits that "these difference This review of Teaching Writing as a Reflective Practice will mention Jacques Derrida.

I couldn't help noting that during his attempt to reconcile quantitative and qualitative research that Hillocks admits that "these differences are, I suspect, exacerbated by the political needs of researchers in newer fields, such as the study of writing, to legitimatize both their objects of study and their methodologies" my emphasis.

george hillocks teaching writing as reflective practice to improve

It'sresearch into teaching writing is still new, so why not mention Derrida at will? After a few chapters, it became clear that Hillocks is actually just a meticulous academic who argues that practice should be driven by theory.

I will admit that at times I felt his calls for context did not require so much Consequently, I couldn't help wondering whether Hillocks' adherence to academic writing hindered his goals, assuming that they are to improve the instruction of writing.

The burden of proof he takes on here suggests that his goal is to defend his strategies against rival academics, as opposed to disseminating his theories to a population of teachers.

TEACHING WRITING AS REFLECTIVE PRACTICE (). George Hillocks Introduction. Writing is a recursive process that requires the reconstruction of text already written, so that what we add connects appropriately with what has proceeded. George Hillocks, Ways of Thinking, Ways of Teaching. WAYS OF THINKING, George Hillocks. Matters of Significance: Differences Among Teachers. Hillocks asks two key questions: How are teachers’ evaluations of their own teaching, their reflective practice, influenced by all of these?. George Hillocks Jr. is a professor in the Department of Education and the Department of English Language and Literature at the University of Chicago, where he is also Director of the Mast of Arts in Teaching/English Program.

Again, however, this may be because he is now considered a trailblazer in the field. And to be fair, it is clear that he is willing to put his ideas into practice, though I was amused to read that he goes into the classroom with a staff of university students to assist him.

Although the thorough explanations backing Hillocks' ideas on how to teach writing will gain him few fans, it is difficult to deny the authority these details lend him.

Perhaps that was the true goal. I'm curious how revolutionary Hillocks' ideas about writing were when he was doing his research, but many of them have taken hold and are taught to teachers-in-training as standard approaches, or prototypes of what are now considered standard strategies.

Hillocks' outline for sequencing lessons, for example, has been refined and in my opinion, improved upon by Wiggins and McTighe. Hillocks suggests that teachers use "gateway activities" to gauge and increase student interest. In my province, this strategy had been adopted as standard by the time I was training for teaching, though we referred to them as "activating activities.

As for "reflective" teaching, this is very much in vogue, though it has been taken advantage of by supporters of standardized testing. Reflection here might best be understood as evaluating how effective activities and strategies are to helping students to reach curriculum goals.

Relying on a standardized test, which will be externally scored and returned months after students complete their work is not as effective in guiding pedagogy as reflecting on the day or week of instruction.

Hillocks relies on his team of university students to evaluate their teaching strategies, and although few teachers today have access to similar resources, it is very common to form "professional learning networks" online to evaluate strategies. Some of Hillocks' other suggestions were less familiar to me.

For example, he disputes Warriner's four modes of writing persuasive, expository, narrative, and descriptiveand suggests that writing curricula be organized around 1 personal narrative, 2 argument, and -- surprisingly -- 3 satire.

Of the these three categories, I appreciated his advice on teaching argument and personal narrative the most.

george hillocks teaching writing as reflective practice to improve

Sadly, satire is taught, but does not enjoy the same level of prestige. Many of the ideas described here have been adopted -- by which I mean that they were very familiar to me. Further, this is not a book that a teacher could pick up to find some interesting or effective activities for a future unit.

George Hillocks by Ashli Yazza on Prezi

However, it is a book that teachers can rely on to plan how their course should teach writing. It also provides a strong model for how to argue in support of specific approaches to teaching writing. And don't forget to reference Derrida during your argument! In other words, students need to write about something they've investigated.

This work is by no means an easy read. Not is it a page-turner. Rather it's demanding and difficult, a book to be reckoned with for those who teach writing.Hillocks, the grand-daddy of research on teaching writing, challenges teachers to think about writing instruction as instruction that includes inquiry about something.

In other words, students need to write about something they've investigated/5. Aug 20,  · Hillocks argues that writing is a key feature of all learning and that students are better students when they improve their writing.

To assist students, teachers of writing must ground their methodologies in theory and practice (life knowledge or experience).

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In TEACHING WRITING AS REFLEXIVE PRACTICE, George Hillocks asks, "What is involved in the efficient teaching of writing?" His book is his attempt to provide a metatheory that would be useful to secondary and college teachers of English/5(3).

TEACHING WRITING AS REFLECTIVE PRACTICE () George Hillocks Introduction Writing is a recursive process that requires the reconstruction of text already written, so that what we add connects appropriately with what has proceeded That process brings ideas not written into conjunction with what has been reconstructed, providing endless opportunities to reconsider ideas and reengage.

Port Manteaux churns out silly new words when you feed it an idea or two. Enter a word (or two) above and you'll get back a bunch of portmanteaux created by jamming together words that are conceptually related to your inputs..

For example, enter "giraffe" and you'll get . Seeking the Best in the Teaching of Writing Tom Romano Miami University, Oxford, Ohio Teaching Writing As Reflective metin2sell.com Hillocks, Jr.

George Hillocks Quotes (Author of Teaching Writing as Reflective Practice)